We offer a variety of services to help individuals, groups and organizations. Whether you are a parent, caregiver, support worker, educator or other professional, the Neurobehavioral Model will support the work you do.

Through consultation, education and training, we:

Through consultation, education and training, we:

  1. Ignite a transformational process and understanding of brain-based conditions such as FASD from a personal and professional perspective through the use and application of the FASCETS Neurobehavioral Model
  2. Empower people to make positive changes in their relationships with others and their communities
  3. Develop an understanding of the source of our deeply held beliefs and values and how they inform our relationship with others
  4. Recognize that each person and their lived experience is unique and complex.

Training Services

Workshop formats (NASW and MHACBO CEUs available):

  • Introduction to The Neurobehavioural Model – 1.5 – 3 hour sessions
  • One-Day Condensed Workshop – 7 hours
  • Two- and Three-Day in-depth Workshops (recommended) – 12 or 18 hours
  • Customized workshops for specific groups
  • Webinars for groups up to 15

Note: Understanding the Neurobehavioral Model and developing consistent accommodations for individuals with FASD takes time. Learning to look at, and respond to, behaviors differently means creating a new paradigm or perspective for the meaning of behaviors. This process takes practice and is real physical work for our brains! Consider this when looking at workshop options and be patient with yourself as you begin to apply the information and tools.

Please contact Nathalie at nbrassard@fascets.org for more details.

Consultation Services

Consultation services on the brain-based approach to FASD and other brain-based conditions are available for caregivers, support workers/professionals, agencies and for larger community groups. These services may include but are not limited to:

  • Assessment of current practices and fit with the needs of individuals living with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and other brain-based conditions
  • Delivery of individualized workshops on the NB Model
  • Support in the implementation and application of the NB Model
  • Support in the development of resources to support the application of the NB Model

Please contact Nathalie at nbrassard@fascets.org for more details.

What Is The Neurobehavioral Model?

FASCETS has created an approach to understanding FASD from a completely different perspective, known as the Neurobehavioral Model. This model is applicable to FASD and any other brain-based conditions, including, but not limited to, autism, ADHD, acquired brain injuries, stroke, dementia, and many others. Our model helps establish the link between the brain and presenting behaviors.

The gift of the neurobehavioral model is in redefining behavioral symptoms in a manner consistent with research. A profound shift is created in moving from anger to compassion, from blaming to acceptance, lessening frustration on all sides, and improving outcomes.

Meet Our Team

We offer a variety of services to help individuals, groups and organizations. Whether you are a parent, caregiver, support worker, educator or other professional, the Neurobehavioral Model will support the work you do.

Staff

Nathalie Brassard, Executive Director

Nicole Branson, Office Administrator

Nancy Hall, Program Director

Melissa Elligson, Program Director

Suzanne Emery, Program Director

Board of Directors

Interested in joining our Board of Directors? Contact us.

The Story of Our Logo

DIANE MALBIN

My older daughter is an artist. She, at age 17, agreed to work on the design. The only suggested parameters were that it be an image that you can look at one way and see one thing, and you can look at it another way and see something else that’s completely different:  Same image, very different understanding of the same thing seen by different people. This captures FASD. None of the impressions is wrong for the person interpreting the design; it just doesn’t fit the person with FASD. 

 

People look at our logo and see different things: It’s a snowflake. A mandala. A flower. Yes, and yet what she drew is concentric circles of people holding hands. If you look closely, you can even see tiny squiggles on the heads of the figures on the outer circle. That’s their hair. 

She captured how things may be seen differently, and how information reframes the meaning and brings everyone together in shared understanding. Shared understanding creates conditions for everyone, all systems, to work together.